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Posts Tagged ‘Jaime Diaz’

What is your take on the Dustin Johnson Rules decision?

What is your take on the Dustin Johnson Rules decision?

What is your take on the Dustin Johnson Rules decision?

Golf Chats is a website to encourage discussions on various subjects relating to the game of golf. I am Mel Sole, Director of Instruction of the Mel Sole Golf School and SAPGA Master Professional.  I invite you to enter into a discussion on this or any article on the golfchats.com website.  The input is for the entire subscriber base to learn something new each time!  Please post your comments below.  Keep it clean and tasteful.  We are here to learn from one another!

The ball did not move!

I have reviewed the video of Dustin Johnson’s apparent violation of Rule 18-2, and I still cannot see how he caused that ball to move. In our justice system in the USA, unless there is overwhelming evidence of guilt, the person is presumed innocent.  I could not see any overwhelming evidence in this case.  Many golf fans disagree with the USGA ruling, and plenty of the PGA players also weighed in as they vented on social media.  To put things in perspective,  Jaime Diaz of Golf World gives us his take on this ruling.

What is your take on the Dustin Johnson Rules decision?

OAKMONT, PA – JUNE 19: Dustin Johnson of the United States chats with a rules official on the fifth green during the final round of the U.S. Open at Oakmont Country Club on June 19, 2016 in Oakmont, Pennsylvania. (Photo by David Cannon/Getty Images)

It was a bad moment for the USGA. But, man, it could have been a million times worse. Dustin Johnson bailed out the governing body by playing well down the stretch on Sunday at the 116th U.S. Open, and his challengers cooperated by playing poorly. It created a big enough stroke swing that what could have been the toughest rules decision in USGA history basically was of no consequence.

What is your take on the Dustin Johnson Rules decision?

Thank you, Dustin! But some advice for the USGA: Please take a hard look at what almost transpired.

A quick recap. On the fifth hole during the final round at Oakmont Country Club, Johnson ran a seven-foot birdie putt four feet past the cup. As he prepared to hit his second putt, Johnson took some practice strokes besides his ball. As he stepped in to address the putt—but before he grounded the club—Johnson noticed his ball had moved slightly. Quickly, he called in rules official Mark Newell. Johnson told him that the ball moved a bit backward, but he had not addressed his putt by grounding his club. Newell confirmed with Johnson “and you didn’t address it?” At that point, with playing partner Lee Westwood confirming Johnson’s view, Newell did determin that a rule had not been broken. Johnson played on, making his putt.

About the time Johnson reached the ninth hole, however, Jeff Hall, managing director of rules & competitions for the USGA, had video brought to his attention that he said had caused concern. After studying the video and consulting with Thomas Pagel, USGA senior director of Rules of Golf and Amateur Status, the two met Johnson on the 12th tee, where Johnson arrived with a one-stroke lead. They told Johnson that the USGA had reviewed video and that officials needed to talk to Johnson about his being the possible cause of his ball moving on the fifth green.

“We told him the USGA could very well assess him a one-stroke penalty,” Hall said.

Johnson crushed a drive on the 12th hole more than 350 yards. He later said that the rules issue didn’t weigh on him as he played on. “I just told myself, we’ll worry about it when we get done,” said Johnson, who felt he was safe because he had not grounded his club behind the ball. “I didn’t think there was going to be a penalty. They said they were going to review. There was nothing I could do about it. Just focus on this next shot. I tried to do that from there, all the way to the house. It was just me and the golf course.”

But Johnson wasn’t as sharp with his shot-making, which had been superb, over the next few holes. With only 210 yards remaining for his second shot on the par-5 12th, he hit a bad push into long rough, from where he didn’t get up and down for the birdie he was counting on. On the par-3 13th, he pulled his approach into a bunker but managed to make a great recovery and saved par. But on the par-4 14th, he took three putts, and the pressure looked like it might be getting to Johnson, just as it seems to happen in several other instances throughout his star-crossed major career.

To see the rest of the USGA’s decision on this matter, go here!

Source : Jaime Diaz  Golf World

Pictures : David Cannon/Getty Images  Hone Morihana

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DeChambeau is the most interesting golfer since Moe Norman!

DeChambeau is the most interesting golfer since Moe Norman!

DeChambeau is the most interesting golfer since Moe Norman!

Golf Chats is a website to encourage discussions on various subjects relating to the game of golf. I am Mel Sole, Director of Instruction of the Mel Sole Golf School and SAPGA Master Professional.  I invite you to enter into a discussion on this or any article on the golfchats.com website.  The input is for the entire subscriber base to learn something new each time!  Please post your comments below.  Keep it clean and tasteful.  We are here to learn from one another!

Bryson DeChambeau reminds me of Moe Norman.  

For those of you who don’t know who Moe Norman was, this Canadian Professional golfer was regarded as the greatest ball-striker who ever lived.  The top players in the world would stop hitting balls and go and watch Moe when he walked onto the range to hit balls.  Both he and DeChambeau have exhibited quirky characteristics.  And each has had definite and individual ideas on how to hit a golf ball. It’s interesting to note that the late Moe Norman is still revered by golfers worldwide today.  Even though he never won a Major or achieved much acclaim in his playing days!

DeChambeau is the most interesting golfer since Moe Norman!

DeChambeau is the most interesting golfer since Moe Norman!

Certain golfers seem destined to enter the game’s history as genuine characters. Of course, top performers often only appear to be so­, because even normal traits placed under a magnifying glass can start to look like eccentricities. But the truest criteria for character status are personality, an appealing narrative and a distinctive natural style. To make the cut, it must all add up to being interestingly different.

At 22, Bryson DeChambeau already checks all the latter boxes as he turns professional after a spectacular late burst as an amateur. In less than a year, the relatively unknown kid from Clovis in California’s dusty Central Valley has become the golf insiders’ favorite topic of curiosity.

There’s no doubt he’s interestingly different.

As a former physics major at SMU, where he skipped his senior year after the school’s golf team was ruled ineligible for postseason play, DeChambeau has a game built on the principles of two arcane science-based golf tomes: The Golfing Machine,by Homer Kelley, and Vector Putting, by H.A. Templeton. Kelley’s 1969 book was the basis for DeChambeau’s decision five years ago to create a set of irons that are all the same length. On the course, he sports a distinctive cap evocative of Ben Hogan—though as a knit by Kangol it harkens to Payne Stewart and Calvin Peete, the slimmer lines modulating a head and features that resemble Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski.

The jock theme is reinforced by DeChambeau’s 6-1, 200-pound physique, but the science-geek persona gains traction with his pastimes like table tennis, shuffleboard, and slacklining—walking along thin straps of tubular webbing stretched between trees like a tightrope—all of which he says improve his “proprioception.” (Quick translation: coordination.)

Of course, DeChambeau can play.

Last year he became only the fifth player, joining Jack Nicklaus, Phil Mickelson, Tiger Woods and Ryan Moore, to win the NCAA and U.S. Amateur championships in the same year. In the seven pro events DeChambeau played in his amateur apprenticeship leading up to the Masters, he made six cuts, including a T-2 at last year’s Australian Masters. His ambitious goal is to capitalize on the seven sponsor exemptions he can count on this season to earn his PGA Tour card, as Jordan Spieth did in 2013 (After finishing T-21 in the Masters, DeChambeau made his pro debut at Hilton Head and finished T-4).

DeChambeau knows he has a presence, and he has a mission. His most stated goal is to influence the game’s multitudes and bring more people to golf. He has been inspired by two meetings with Arnold Palmer, whose example of giving back on a large scale he expects to emulate. Because at this point in his life, Bryson DeChambeau is pretty sure he can do anything.

Consider his explanation for writing his full name backward with his left hand, which could be taken as the DeChambeau Manifesto.

“It’s not talent, it’s just practice,” he says in a voice that sounds like it belongs to an older person. “If I wanted to learn Arabic or Russian, I could. Or tie my shoes in a new way, I could. Why? Dedication. I’m not really smart, but I’m dedicated. I can be good at anything if I love it and dedicate myself. And I love history, love science. I love music and golf, love learning, and life. I love trying to be the best at anything and everything.”

Yes, DeChambeau can come on strong, in a way that could easily come off as grandstanding to his peers. But it’s telling that amateurs like him as he compes against and has been well-received by pros.

To read the rest of this interesting article by Jaime Diaz, go here!

Source:   Golf Digest

Photos:

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A sit down with Donald Trump to talk Golf and the Presidency!

A sit down with Donald Trump to talk Golf and the Presidency!

A sit down with Donald Trump to talk Golf and the Presidency!

Golf Chats is a website to encourage discussions on various subjects relating to the game of golf. I am Mel Sole, Director of Instruction of the Mel Sole Golf School and SAPGA Master Professional.  I invite you to enter into a discussion on this or any article on the golfchats.com website.  The input is for the entire subscriber base to learn something new each time!  Please post your comments below.  Keep it clean and tasteful.  We are here to learn from one another!

Love him or hate him, Donald Trump moves the needle!  

He always expresses a refreshing opinion, compared to the humming and hawing of most politicians. He certainly has been successful in his business enterprises, and with golf being at the forefront, how will his position (if he is elected President) affect his courses?   of Golf Digest sits down with Donald to get some answers.

This interview was conducted in Donald Trump’s office on the 26th floor of the Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan. The day before, the PGA of America had cancelled this year’s Grand Slam of Golf, which had been scheduled to be played at Trump National Golf Club Los Angeles in October, but was moved from that venue after Trump’s controversial comments about Mexican immigrants in July, which caused several corporations to disassociate from him. Trump, 69, seemed unbothered by the news, he and his spokesman pointing out that he still has three years on his contract to host the event, and that the decision to move the venue had allowed time to remove a waterfall on the course.

A sit down with Donald Trump to talk Golf and the Presidency!

You’ve become a major player in golf. How would you compare how you’ve reached that station to how you’ve become a major political player in your run for President?

I think very different in one way, and very similar in another. My golf is very high end. Great locations, great courses, highly acclaimed. And the word quality is important.  I have locations that are good for many other things. So I’m not necessarily stuck in the world of golf. But I choose to be. But I have land that is so valuable, that if I ever wanted to do housing on it, as an example, but I just don’t choose to do that.

For government, you have to do it differently, but I think the quality of what we would do would be much better. Our infrastructure has to be rebuilt. Our bridges are literally crumbling. They need work and nobody is doing anything. Our roads, our schools, our airports. So I think I’d start a process where we would have a much higher quality at a much lesser cost. I think there would be far better management. You look at the vets, how badly they’ve been treated. Reports have come out that 300,000 vets have died waiting to get into the Veteran’s administration.

A sit down with Donald Trump to talk Golf and the Presidency!

It’s probably at the worst point it’s ever been. So I think the management of the country would be much better. And I think I get great credit for management, not only for my golf courses but the way I manage the company.

I’m not “mean and lean.”

I respect lean and mean, but I don’t think my style is lean and mean. I spend more money than I would have to. But I like to see it perfect. And I see a lot of people who spend a lot of money and don’t make it perfect, and that’s the worst of all combinations.

There is tremendous fat in government. A lot can be cut. We have to, because look at the budget deficits that we have. Look at the money that we owe. We owe $19 trillion. That’s hard to believe. That’s a big job when you think of it.

But one thing about government, you have to manage, but you also have to manage with a heart. You need heart. In golf you don’t have to manage with heart. Or in business you don’t necessarily have to manage with heart. But in government you do have to manage with heart. And I understand that.

What have you learned from the presidential experience?

Well, I had no idea it would be this big, number one. Because when you look at what’s happening in terms of the level of popularity and the polls, I didn’t think it would be that fast.  Nobody thought I was going to run.  Once I made the announcment, it’s all started to happen very fast.

Number two, it’s a nasty business. It’s nasty. I find great dishonesty. Sort of the opposite of golf, I find great dishonesty in the world of politics.

To read the rest of this interesting interview, go here!

Source:   Golf Digest

Pictures: 

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Can Anybody Figure Out the (almost) great Dustin Johnson?

Can Anybody Figure Out the (almost) great Dustin Johnson?

Can Anybody Figure Out the (almost) great Dustin Johnson?

Golf Chats is a website to encourage discussions on various subjects relating to the game of golf. I am Mel Sole, Director of Instruction of the Mel Sole Golf School and SAPGA Master Professional.  I invite you to enter into a discussion on this or any article on the golfchats.com website.  The input is for the entire subscriber base to learn something new each time!  Please post your comments below.  Keep it clean and tasteful.  We are here to learn from one another!

Dustin Johnson is so near greatness, and yet so far!  

Every time he seems ready to step up and claim that Major Championship that everybody believes he deserves, something ( PGA Championship) or someone (US Open) gets in the way!  Some people question his desire, but I think they are way off the mark.  People questioned Freddy Couples in the beginning as well.  Just because you are laid back doesn’t mean you don’t have the fire burning deep down inside.  Can Dustin win a Major and claw his way into the upper echelons of the sport?  Only time will tell.  Or, in this case, Jaime Diaz of Golf World Digital gives us his views on the subject!

Can Anybody Figure Out the (almost) great Dustin Johnson?

2015 Chambers Bay. 72nd Hole.

Funny how Dustin Johnson seems to have been forgotten. Or maybe it’s that his recent past is uncomfortable to recall.

We’re talking about the three major championship nightmares of 2015.

First on the 72nd green at Chambers Bay, where two epic shots left him a 15-footer for eagle to win the U.S. Open, he ended up three-putting to lose. Then at St. Andrews, he took the lead at the Open Championship with a 65-69 start, but finished 75-75 to end up T-49. He even had an outside chance at redemption in the PGA Championship at Whistling Straits, but made quadruple-bogey on the first hole Sunday, ham-handedly employing a wedge five times.

Currently, DJ’s is not the feel-good story that blends with the heroics of Jordan Spieth and Jason Day and, now, Rickie Fowler. At least Rory McIlroy’s 2015 shortcomings could be mostly blamed on injury.

Roughly 11 months ago it was Johnson—who at 30 resolved to take more responsibility for his life after returning from a six-month sabbatical to resolve personal problems—being projected as the year’s burgeoning star. When he won the WGC-Cadillac Championship at Doral in March, it was his ninth career PGA Tour victory, and he became only the fourth golfer (joining Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods) to win in each of his first eight seasons. Yet now the suspicion is that the still majorless Johnson could be damaged goods.

If so, you could never tell by DJ. With his full beard, cool saunter and always positive rap, Johnson makes sure every outward indicator says “I’m fine.” His game is in good shape under Butch and Claude Harmon; his dedication to honing his 6-foot-4, 190-pound frame under trainer Joey Diovisalvi continues; raising their now 1-year-old son, Tatum, with Paulina Gretzky has made Johnson a better man; and his younger brother and best friend, Austin, remains his caddie.

To read the rest of this interesting story on Dustin, go here!

Source: Jaime Diaz    Golf World Digital

Pictures: ImagopixATL

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Get off your duff and make time for golf in 2016 - It's not hard!

Get off your duff and make time for golf in 2016 – It’s not hard!

Get off your duff and make time for golf in 2016 – It’s not hard!

 of Golf Digest is one of my favorite golf journalists.  I enjoy his writing, so I read his articles every time I see one.  This time it was a quote in the middle of the article that caught my attention and deserved some discussion.  The quote is, “But what used to be time for rounds of golf has been overtaken by other stuff. I feel undeserving of leisure when so much seems undone.”

I recently returned from teaching for almost 3 weeks at my school in Mexico and had many catch-ups to do.  My desk was piled high with mail and bills to pay.  But you know what?  I was completely caught up in 2 days.  2 days!  This taught me a lesson, and Jaime’s quote brought it to a head.  We sometimes create extra work just to feel busy.  People ask me to play golf, and I say, “Sorry, I’m too busy!”  No, I’m not!  So my New Years’ resolution is to get out of the office when I’m not teaching (I have to make a living like everyone else) and head to the range for practice or to the course for a round!  Last year I played a total of about 20 rounds.  This year I’m going to make that at least 50.

My challenge to all who do not play because they are too busy is getting out there and making this your breakthrough year!  

Come to Golf School and start the year with some positive thoughts and feelings for your golf game.  Make time for golf!

 Get off your duff and make time for golf in 2016 - It's not hard!

Pawleys Plantation Golf and Country Club.

Where’s golf? It’s a question that repeats in the mind, especially at the start of a new year.

Growing up, I knew that while golf was important to me, it wasn’t that big a deal to most other people. Which was fine—it was rewarding having a little-known world dense with riches as a welcoming refuge. After I became a golf writer, I never worried about my obsessions having a small but reciprocal audience. Basically, I had faith in the intrinsic perfection of the game.

That was confirmed in the 1990s, when golf suddenly got discovered by a larger populace. Tiger Woods helped turn many on to the game, but it was more about a confluence of people having sufficient time and money to try it for themselves, along with the desire for an antidote to the increasing speed of modern living. The game’s powers of renewal—known to golfers for centuries—crossed over.

With the popularity came the American capitalistic drive for growth, a bubble and a backlash. All during which the world changed at a faster rate than it ever has.

The last decade has been a tough one for golf, and it goes well beyond the fortunes of Tiger.

Crucially, less of the game’s oxygen—money and time—has been available. Cultural changes, like the alterations in parenting and the tyranny of the smartphone (on which you might be reading this), haven’t helped. As entertainment activities increasing must be packaged for hand-held consumption, golf seems more arcane.

Recently, though, I’ve noted some optimism surrounding the state of the game.

In particular, the professional tours and their players are more appealing than ever, as if everyone has taken lessons from Arnold Palmer (highly recommended, by the way). The economy seems to be improving, and the unseasonably warm winter has extended the playing season. In a bit of over exuberance that betrays how bad things got, there’s been commentary positing that 2015 was the best golf year ever.

Honestly, I’m not exactly sure where golf is. I know that my prism reveals both bleakness and hope. I don’t play nearly enough, though I probably make more air swings in elevators, hit more wedge shots in the back yard and putt at more table legs. But what used to be time for rounds of golf has been overtaken by other stuff. I feel undeserving of leisure when so much seems undone.

To read the rest of Jaime’s story on golf’s steady growth in 2015, go here!

Source:   Golf Digest

Pictures: Keyur Khamar/PGA TOUR   Rob Stinnett

Thanks for reading – Get off your duff and make time for golf in 2016 – It’s not hard!

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The young guns are coming - The young guns are coming!

The young guns are coming – The young guns are coming!

The young guns are coming – The young guns are coming!
 
Golf Chats is a website to encourage discussions on various subjects relating to the game of golf. I am Mel Sole, Director of Instruction of the Mel Sole Golf School and SAPGA Master Professional.  I invite you to enter into a discussion on this or any article on the golfchats.com website.  The input is for the entire subscriber base to learn something new each time!  Please post your comments below.  Keep it clean and tasteful.  We are here to learn from one another!

The young guns refer to players in their 20’s on the PGA Tour!

Well, pretty good if you are referring to the PGA Tour!  The youth movement has picked up steam and it looks like there is no stopping these ultra-confident players who perform like veterans right out of the gate!  With more confidence than a lion in a field of lambs, they stride onto the first tee saying “Who’s going to be second today?”
Thanks to  of Golf Digest for this great article!
The young guns are coming - The young guns are coming!

Getty Images

For a long time now, golf’s been obsessed with youth movements.

Arnold Palmer was part of the first one, back in 1960, when Sports Illustrated on its cover declared him – along with Dow Finsterwald and Ken Venturi – one of golf’s “young lions.” Palmer was 30, as was Finsterwald (Venturi was 29), youngish for top golfers then.

Several projections of domination by new waves of 20-somethings have followed, none of which came to true fruition. Some hitched their wagons to a virtuoso who had picked off a fistful of majors by age 25 – like Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy. But one golfer does not a youth movement make.

It’s why I remained a youth movement skeptic, even as touring pro’s prime years have begun to start earlier. For every Rory and Rickie and Dustin there were a counterbalancing Phil, Furyk and Zach. And at least in 2013, a certain Player-of-the-Year named Woods.

As Johnny Miller, who had 18 victories in his twenties (as did Tom Watson), observed in 2010. “We keep hearing there are all these great young players, but none of them have won very often. They look like they should be doing it, but nobody’s really doing it.”

But now, I think, they really are. Critical mass has been attained. I’m a youth skeptic no more.

The young guns are coming - The young guns are coming!

AP

 

The anecdotal evidence has piled up. Emiliano Grillo and Smylie Kaufman, both 23-year-old PGA Tour rookies, have won the first two events of the wraparound season. It means the winners of nine of the last 11 events on PGA Tour were in their twenties. Overall, 24 events in the 2014-2015 season were won by 20-somethings, a PGA Tour record.

Over the next few weeks of Fall events, when veterans typically take a rest and Web.com graduates come out gung-ho, look for more of the same.

The current movement is being led by the World Ranking leading trio of Jordan Spieth, 22, McIlroy, 26, and Jason Day, 27.

And there is the vaunted high school Class of 2011, consisting of Spieth, Daniel Berger, Justin Thomas, Grillo, Patrick Rodgers and Ollie Scheiderjans. But what’s happening is not so much about individuals as the collective.

There has been a discernible increase in truly competitive, younger-than-ever players who are ready to win. They might have names we barely know, but there are really no more upsets or even Cinderella stories in pro golf.

It’s evolution – from a litany of factors. Bigger and athletes drawn to the sport, following better fitness regimens, who have emulated physical specimens like Tiger, Dustin and Rory. There is more intense early competition, and equipment that can be tuned to minimize persistent flaws, breeding more confidence to swing harder.

But the biggest reason? Style of play.

 
 
 
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