Posts Tagged ‘Rob Labritz’

Protein Based Diet!

A protein-based diet for Golf Fitness.

You can’t go wrong with A protein-based diet for Golf Fitness is the subject of today’s Fitness Friday.  A Golf Video Blog with Mel Sole, Director of Instruction and Master Professional at the Mel Sole Golf School, located at Pawleys Plantation Golf and Country Club in Pawleys Island, SC.

On Fridays we not only present tips ourselves that will help your game, but also curate articles from well know fitness instructors in the golfing industry. Nutrition and fitness go hand in glove, so don’t try and get your body in shape without a healthy diet as well.  Rob Labritz for PGA.com give you some correct steps to go about this!

“Pay attention to what you put in your body.” Surely you’ve heard that from your doctor countless times. Well, now you’re going to hear it from PGA Professional Rob Labritz.

Emphasis on a protein-based diet for Golf Fitness.

In this week’s installment of our “Become a complete golfer” series, Labritz is putting a major emphasis on nutrition. “Make smart choices,” he said. “You can’t go wrong with a protein-based diet.  It must also include fruits and vegetables without a lot of sugary carbohydrates. You do need some carbohydrates for brain function, but you don’t need the kinds that are slathered in sugar.”

Over the course of this series, Labritz has stressed the importance of keeping everything “in balance.” It isn’t just your mind and your swing. It extends to what you’re eating, too. For instance, Labritz said, if you’re the kind of person who thinks fueling up on the course means a hot dog and a soft drink at the turn, you may want to reevaluate — particularly if you’re serious about improving all aspects of your game. “Basically you’re messing yourself up pretty bad if you opt for a hot dog and Coke,” he said. “You’ll probably have a sugar high for 45 minutes and then a crash. When your body does that, your mind does the same thing. It’s hard to stay balanced.” 

Labritz is a self-described “strict eater” when it comes to life in general and believes a protein-based diet is something everyone should buy into and make a part of their lifestyle. So how do you apply nutrition to the course? Like everything else, it has to do with preparation. 

The Goal.

The goal on the course is to keep your energy high and your focus throughout. You don’t want to be full out there, but you certainly don’t want to be starving either. Labritz recommends eating a good meal 3-4 hours before your tee time. If it’s an early morning tee time and you don’t have time to get that solid meal in, here’s what Labritz suggests.

To see the rest of this story and what Rob Labritz suggests how to correct it to improve your game, go here!

Source: Rob Labritz    Pga.com    Mel Sole Golf School.

 

Trying to break through to scoring in the 80’s? Check this out!

Trying to take your game from shooting in the mid to low 90’s to scoring in the 80’s takes just two things according to PGA member Rob Labritz.  Iron Control and Driver Control!  Read the rest of this interesting article if breaking 90 is oh so close!  Thanks to pga.com and Rob Labrtiz for sharing!
Rob Labritz
USA Today Sports Images
Trying to beat those milestone scores like 100, 90, 80 and 70? In the third of this four-part series, PGA Professional Rob Labritz offers up some great advice that’s sure to make you a better player. For this week, Labritz focuses on those trying to break 80.
In this week’s “best advice” column with PGA Professional Rob Labritz, we’re turning our eyes to the better players out there who are on the cusp of a single-digit handicap – the ones looking to break “80” on a consistent basis.
Even if your game fits into this category, you’re going to want to go back and touch up on the tips forbreaking “100” and breaking “90.” After all, Labritz’s entire theory of becoming a better player starts at the green and working your way backwards to the tee. So, provided you’ve gotten yourself comfortable with the short game inside of 100 yards, this is the piece for you. How the heck can you break 80? Labritz chalks it up to just two things: iron control and driver control. It may seem simple, but there’s some “charting” that goes into it – and that starts with the irons. “There are a few things I use,” said Labritz, fresh off a win in the MasterCard Westchester PGA Championship on Thursday. “First, you want to get access to some type of measuring device. If you can use something like Trackman, or another type of launch monitor, or even the Game Golf device, that’s a great place to start. The thing is, you want to learn how far your ball travels with each iron.” Once you figure that out, Labritz said, it eliminates the guesswork. “Play a couple of rounds, or spend time on the range just dialing in the distances your irons travel,” Labritz said. “And if you don’t have access to what we’ve already covered, a laser rangefinder will work too. Once you’re hitting consistent iron shots, hit the target where the ball is landing with a laser and see how far it’s flying.” When you get comfortable with that, it’s time to step back to the tee. “The key to hitting a tee shot has nothing to do with hitting it as far as you can,” Labritz said. “It’s all about positioning. It’s about playing the hole from the green backwards. When you’re on the tee, imagine you’re looking down the fairway from the green and ask yourself, ‘where do I have to hit this tee shot to give myself the best position to get my iron-shot approach into the area of the flag on this green?’” Like most, you may be programmed to think that with driver in hand, you should take a mighty lash at the ball from the tee. You’re wrong. Over-swinging leads to problems with balance and that’s the reason for your wayward tee shots. Labritz has a simple fix for that.