Posts Tagged ‘Ron Kasprisky’

A different way to chip! This might be the answer you have been looking for!

I have taught this method over the years to students who struggle with the conventional method.  Listen up as A.J. Avoli, one of Golf Digest’s Best Young Teachers explains a different way to chip with this innovative method.  He is director of instruction at the Omni La Costa Resort & Spa in Carlsbad, Calif.
Over time, a simple method for getting the ball from off the green to the flagstick fell out of favor. I rarely see anyone chip like the late Hall of Fame golfer Paul Runyan. That’s a shame because this technique will make you more accurate around the greens with a lot less practice. Once you master the setup and learn to make a rhythmic stroke—like putting—you’ll start getting up and down more often. Let me show you how to chip old school.
To see the rest of this informative article, go here! Source: Golf Digest  Ron Kasprisky  A.J. Avoli Picture: Beth Rankin

How do we Speed up Play? Here are 25 different ways!

Slow play is a major problem on golf courses in the USA.  I have noticed when playing over in Scotland, Ireland, and England, golfers play well within the 4 hours suggested time.  I played at North Berwick a few years ago, and when I went to pay my green fees at the Caddie Masters Shack, I noticed a sign that read “A round of golf should be played in 3 hours.”  I said to the Caddie Master “Do all your members play in 3 hours?”  “Oh, no sir, that is for the Americans.  If we say 3 hours, they’ll at least play in 4!”  Here are a few suggestions from   of Golf Digest to help speed up your next round of golf and make it more fun for everyone!

speed-up-play

This certainly doesn’t apply to you. You’re the fastest golfer you know, right? Right. Anyway, maybe you can still review this list of helpful tips for how to shave time off a round and, perhaps, pass it on to golfers who could really use it. Just a thought.

1) Play like you have only three hours to finish the round before the sun sets.

2) Ditch your headcovers. Taking them on and off all day is a serious time suck.

3) Play it forward at least one tee box.

4) Check the time when you tee off and check again every three holes. For some reason, it helps make you play faster.

5) Mixed foursome? Forward-tee players should ride with other forward-tee players. Back tees with back tees.

6) Agreeing to play “ready golf” is essential for a casual round. But you’ll play even faster if you keep putting until your ball is conceded or holed.

7) Only mark a short putt to clean it.

8) Don’t wait for dawdlers. They’ll start playing faster as a result.

9) First golfer on a par 3 gets the yardage and announces it to everyone.

10) First to hit on a par 3 stands at the ready to fill divot holes.

To read the other 15 ways to play a little quicker in your next round, go here!

Source :   Golf Digest

Pictures : Golf Digest  Bob Cotter

5 Important fundamentals for Driving the ball like Rory!

http://www.golfdigest.com/story/rory-mcilroys-5-keys-to-rip-your-driverBeing a good driver of the ball requires an understanding of good fundamentals.  This means knowing what your body must do to deliver the club face square to the ball at impact, with the club head path moving along the target line.  To help you understand the process even better, here is   with help from Ron Kaspriske and Golf Digest photographer  to bringing you 5 things you MUST do to be a consistent driver of the golf ball!
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It’s important to have swing thoughts on the tee. They help take your mind off all the bad things that can happen and put your focus on what you need to do to put one in the fairway.

Way down the fairway. But just as important as mechanical thoughts is making sure you’re swinging with good tempo, particularly with the driver. You could have amazing technique, but if you can’t put it all together with the right rhythm, you won’t hit your best tee shots. So let’s start there as we try to make this your Year of the Driver.

It’s important to have swing thoughts on the tee. They help take your mind off all the bad things that can happen and put your focus on what you need to do to put one in the fairway.

Way down the fairway. But just as important as mechanical thoughts is making sure you’re swinging with good tempo, particularly with the driver. You could have amazing technique, but if you can’t put it all together with the right rhythm, you won’t hit your best tee shots. So let’s start there as we try to make this your Year of the Driver.

You might notice I’m wearing in-ear headphones. I like to listen to music when I practice to help improve my rhythm. I tend to get a little quick in the transition from backswing to downswing, especially as tournaments get closer to Sunday and I’ve got a chance to win. Listening to music helps throttle back my tempo. I’m not talking about upbeat hip-hop or some Celtic metal band. I need something a little more mellow when I hit balls: acoustic stuff like Coldplay’s older music, Ed Sheeran, Bon Iver.

My first tip for you is to find the rhythm that produces good, solid strikes over and over. It’s probably less violent than the swing you’d instinctively make. Keep rehearsing with the driver until you feel smooth from start to finish. Then, go back to the swing thoughts that click for you. I’ll share some of the things I’m working on with my driver to get ready for the Masters. If you want this to be your Year of the Driver, I think they can help.—With Ron Kaspriske


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CREATE YOUR FOUNDATION Stability is important in any athletic movement, but it’s absolutely critical when you want to swing your driver with more power. There’s never a point in my swing when I feel like I’m losing control of my body. Even when I’m swinging my fastest and really firing into the ball, I know I’m going to stay in balance. Watch my swing, and you’ll see how quiet I am at the finish.

It starts with getting into a comfortable, tension-free position at address (above), but one where you feel free to swing the club with some speed. That delicate blend of being relaxed and ready to move at high speeds is something to focus on when practicing. The stance is key. If there’s too much weight out on your toes or back on your heels, you’re starting from an unstable position. Feel that your legs are solidly under you.

To read the other 4 fundamentals to make your driver scream down the fairway, go here!

Source : Ron Kaspriske  

Pictures : 

   

Build stability and strength simultaneously with the Physio Ball!

The Physio or “Swiss” ball is a piece of exercise equipment that is not expensive but a must-have, if you want a great workout.  It provides an unstable environment that forces the core muscles to engage, creating stability.  It is a great tool for sit-up’s as it is easy on the back.  My favorite, the plank, is done first with your feet on the ground, and once you have mastered that, put your feet up on a small table or chair to create a really good core and balance workout.  Thanks to  of Golf Digest for this article.  Go to the link below for additional videos with the Physio Ball.

Back in 2014, we put Dustin Johnson’s girlfriend, Paulina Gretzky (left), through the paces of a golf workout including use of one of the most beneficial pieces of equipment in any gym—a physio ball. There are literally dozens of exercises you can do with one, and Golf Digest fitness advisor Ben Shear and I demonstrate a few of them below. Physio balls cost $20-$40 and come in various sizes. Typically men should use a 75mm ball while women would be better off using a 65mm or 55mm ball. It’s smart to check this out before buying.

Why is a physio ball so useful? In a word: Instability. In order to perform most exercises with a ball, your body has to make up for the lack of stability that the spongy, round ball doesn’t have. So you have to use several muscle groups—most notably the core muscles around your midsection—in order to avoid falling off the ball. This “stability-first” mandate is similar to what needs to happen in order for you to swing a golf club effectively and safely. Without bracing yourself, you can’t swing a golf club without losing your balance.

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The plank that Paulina is demonstrating here is just one of many exercises all golfers should incorporate into their routines. This one is especially good if you move the ball around with your forearms rather than just staying still. You’ll really feel it working your core muscles.

For some great Physio Ball Workout Videos by Ron, go here!

Source :    Golf Digest

Pictures : Golf Digest