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The Greatest Moments in Pebble Beach History!

The Greatest Moments in Pebble Beach History!

The Greatest Moments in Pebble Beach History!

Golf Chats is a website to encourage discussions on various subjects relating to the game of golf. I am Mel Sole, Director of Instruction of the Mel Sole Golf School and SAPGA Master Professional.  I invite you to enter into a discussion on this or any article on the golfchats.com website.  The input is for the entire subscriber base to learn something new each time!  Please post your comments below.  Keep it clean and tasteful.  We are here to learn from one another!

This week is the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am.  A tournament we all look forward to, like this week, all the golfing celebrities come out and mingle with the pros and the crowd.  A fun time is had by all in the midst of a 72 hole stroke play event that has been won by every great golfer that has ever set foot on a golf course.  Here are some great golfing moments presented by Swing by Swing

Pebble Beach Golf Links has seen its fair share of great golf over the years. From unbelievable performances to incredible hole-outs, to of course the celebrity pro-am, there’s been no shortage of excitement on the Monterey Peninsula. Here is a look at 10 of the best moments in Pebble Beach history.

Tiger Woods – 2000 U.S. Open

Tiger Woods at the 2000 U.S. Open put on one of the greatest golfing displays of all time. Shattering multiple records en route to lapping the field by 15 shots, he went on to claim his second major title. In fact, he was the only player under par the entire week.

Jack Nicklaus – 1972 U.S. Open

Jack Nicklaus hit one of the most famous shots of all time on the 71st hole of the 1972 U.S. Open. His one-iron hit the flag stick nearly dropping for an ace on the famed par-3 17th. He had to settle for a tap-in but it gave the Golden Bear the spark he needed to go on and win his third U.S. Open title.

Tom Watson – 1982 U.S. Open

Who can forget Tom Watson’s chip-in on the 17th hole during the 1982 U.S. Open? After leaving himself with an impossible shot in the deep rough, Watson managed to knock it in for the unlikeliest of twos. He went on to win his only U.S. Open title.

Tiger Woods – 2000 AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am

Tiger Woods was seven shots off the lead with seven holes to play during the 2000 AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am, when lightning struck on the par-4 15th hole. Tiger jarred his approach from 97-yards for eagle fueling a comeback win for the ages.

Johnny Miller – 1994 AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am

Johnny Miller’s win at the 1994 AT&T was remarkable considering he took a break from his broadcasting post on the 18th tower to compete in an event he won 7 years prior. “I play young at Pebble,” the 46-year-old said and did he ever.

To see the rest of the Top 10 Greatest Moments in Pebble Beach History, go here!

Source: Swing by Swing

Pictures: Getty Images    John Mabanglo    Phil Sheldon/Popperfoto    Andy Lyons    Gary Newkirk   Ted Durian Collection, courtesy Pebble Beach Company

Thanks for reading – The Greatest Moments in Pebble Beach History!  Hope you enjoyed it as much as I.

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What is your take on the Dustin Johnson Rules decision?

What is your take on the Dustin Johnson Rules decision?

What is your take on the Dustin Johnson Rules decision?

Golf Chats is a website to encourage discussions on various subjects relating to the game of golf. I am Mel Sole, Director of Instruction of the Mel Sole Golf School and SAPGA Master Professional.  I invite you to enter into a discussion on this or any article on the golfchats.com website.  The input is for the entire subscriber base to learn something new each time!  Please post your comments below.  Keep it clean and tasteful.  We are here to learn from one another!

The ball did not move!

I have reviewed the video of Dustin Johnson’s apparent violation of Rule 18-2, and I still cannot see how he caused that ball to move. In our justice system in the USA, unless there is overwhelming evidence of guilt, the person is presumed innocent.  I could not see any overwhelming evidence in this case.  Many golf fans disagree with the USGA ruling, and plenty of the PGA players also weighed in as they vented on social media.  To put things in perspective,  Jaime Diaz of Golf World gives us his take on this ruling.

What is your take on the Dustin Johnson Rules decision?

OAKMONT, PA – JUNE 19: Dustin Johnson of the United States chats with a rules official on the fifth green during the final round of the U.S. Open at Oakmont Country Club on June 19, 2016 in Oakmont, Pennsylvania. (Photo by David Cannon/Getty Images)

It was a bad moment for the USGA. But, man, it could have been a million times worse. Dustin Johnson bailed out the governing body by playing well down the stretch on Sunday at the 116th U.S. Open, and his challengers cooperated by playing poorly. It created a big enough stroke swing that what could have been the toughest rules decision in USGA history basically was of no consequence.

What is your take on the Dustin Johnson Rules decision?

Thank you, Dustin! But some advice for the USGA: Please take a hard look at what almost transpired.

A quick recap. On the fifth hole during the final round at Oakmont Country Club, Johnson ran a seven-foot birdie putt four feet past the cup. As he prepared to hit his second putt, Johnson took some practice strokes besides his ball. As he stepped in to address the putt—but before he grounded the club—Johnson noticed his ball had moved slightly. Quickly, he called in rules official Mark Newell. Johnson told him that the ball moved a bit backward, but he had not addressed his putt by grounding his club. Newell confirmed with Johnson “and you didn’t address it?” At that point, with playing partner Lee Westwood confirming Johnson’s view, Newell did determin that a rule had not been broken. Johnson played on, making his putt.

About the time Johnson reached the ninth hole, however, Jeff Hall, managing director of rules & competitions for the USGA, had video brought to his attention that he said had caused concern. After studying the video and consulting with Thomas Pagel, USGA senior director of Rules of Golf and Amateur Status, the two met Johnson on the 12th tee, where Johnson arrived with a one-stroke lead. They told Johnson that the USGA had reviewed video and that officials needed to talk to Johnson about his being the possible cause of his ball moving on the fifth green.

“We told him the USGA could very well assess him a one-stroke penalty,” Hall said.

Johnson crushed a drive on the 12th hole more than 350 yards. He later said that the rules issue didn’t weigh on him as he played on. “I just told myself, we’ll worry about it when we get done,” said Johnson, who felt he was safe because he had not grounded his club behind the ball. “I didn’t think there was going to be a penalty. They said they were going to review. There was nothing I could do about it. Just focus on this next shot. I tried to do that from there, all the way to the house. It was just me and the golf course.”

But Johnson wasn’t as sharp with his shot-making, which had been superb, over the next few holes. With only 210 yards remaining for his second shot on the par-5 12th, he hit a bad push into long rough, from where he didn’t get up and down for the birdie he was counting on. On the par-3 13th, he pulled his approach into a bunker but managed to make a great recovery and saved par. But on the par-4 14th, he took three putts, and the pressure looked like it might be getting to Johnson, just as it seems to happen in several other instances throughout his star-crossed major career.

To see the rest of the USGA’s decision on this matter, go here!

Source : Jaime Diaz  Golf World

Pictures : David Cannon/Getty Images  Hone Morihana

Thanks for reading – What is your take on the Dustin Johnson Rules decision?

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Are you a betting man – Here are tempting odds for the US Open.

Are you a betting man – Here are tempting odds for the US Open.
 
Golf Chats is a website to encourage discussions on various subjects relating to the game of golf. I am Mel Sole, Director of Instruction of the Mel Sole Golf School and SAPGA Master Professional.  I invite you to enter into a discussion on this or any article on the golfchats.com website.  The input is for the entire subscriber base to learn something new each time!  Please post your comments below.  Keep it clean and tasteful.  We are here to learn from one another!
 
 of Golf Digest has put together an interesting list of sleeper picks and the Under/Over for possible bets for the US Open.  I think it will be fun to get a group of buddies together and take a shot at predicting these outcomes.  Something to talk about on Monday morning!

OAKMONT, Pa. — We’ve produced our U.S. Open favorites and sleeper picks, but how about a list of side bets and wagers for the degenerate gambler in us all? Using odds from Top Bet Sportsbook, here are the 10 best props, wagers and odds for the 2016 U.S. Open at Oakmont Country Club:

What will the winner make on the first hole on Sunday? Par or better (-105), Bogey or worse (-130)

Are you a betting man - Here are tempting odds for the US Open.

The 482-yard par 4 is one of the most challenging opening holes in the game. At the 2007 U.S. Open, the field averaged a 4.515 score on Oakmont’s first, the third-highest mark on the course behind the 18th and 10th holes. Figures like that would seem to indicate bogey is the prefered route.

However, there were more pars and birdies (230) than bogeys and higher (207) in 2007. Moreover, Angel Cabrera, the winner that year, recorded a par in his victory march, which is why we are going par or better for this bet.

Winning Nationality: American (-115), European (+220), Rest of the World (+275)

For those scoring at home, that “rest of the world” umbrella covers tournament favorite Jason Day (7-1), as well as Adam Scott (30-1), Hideki Matsuyama (30-1, and a guy a lot of people like this week) and Louis Oosthuizen (50-1). If you’re booking with Day or the aforementioned trio, include this prop as a parlay.

Will Jordan Spieth finish in the top 5? Yes (+125), No (-200)

Are you a betting man - Here are tempting odds for the US Open.

Well, here are his last five finishes in majors: 1st, 1st, T-4th, 2nd, T-2nd. It’s an absurd streak, one that doesn’t seem sustainable…but I’m sure as hell not going against the Golden Child.

Will there be a hole-in-one? Yes (+240), No (-320)

There’s a 300-yard par 3, basically rendering the field to just three opportunities, and the last par 3 is a 231-yard bear. Wet weather on Thursday and Friday will give players a fighter’s chance, but Oakmont and the USGA have too much pride in this layout to bestow an ace. Circle “no.”

Winning margin: 1 stroke (+250), 2 strokes (+375), 3 strokes (+475), 4 strokes or more (+300), Playoff (+260)

Jason Day said Oakmont’s set-up could lead to a runaway victor. Far be it from me to question 1) The world’s best player and 2) An Aussie. Four strokes or more is our pick.

Are you a betting man - Here are tempting odds for the US Open.

Will Rickie Fowler finish in the top 10? Yes (+220), No (-300)

Are you a betting man - Here are tempting odds for the US Open.

Fowler’s 2014 campaign, one in which he finished in the top five in every major, seems long ago. Fowler’s best performance last season was a T-12 at Augusta. Worse, Fowler is not bringing his “A” game into Oakmont, missing the cut at the Masters, Players Championship and Memorial.

Fowler thrives on longer courses, but Oakmont is one of the few major venues that doesn’t cater to bombers. Add it up and the answer is “no” for Fowler this week.

To see the rest of these interesting Bets and odds, go here!

Source:   Golf Digest

Pictures: Getty Images

Thanks for reading – Are you a betting man – Here are tempting odds for the US Open.

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Chin Up Jordan - All the greats have lost in dramatic fashion!

Chin Up Jordan – All the greats have lost in dramatic fashion!

Chin Up Jordan – All the greats have lost in dramatic fashion!

Golf Chats is a website to encourage discussions on various subjects relating to the game of golf. I am Mel Sole, Director of Instruction of the Mel Sole Golf School and SAPGA Master Professional.  I invite you to enter into a discussion on this or any article on the golfchats.com website.  The input is for the entire subscriber base to learn something new each time!  Please post your comments below.  Keep it clean and tasteful.  We are here to learn from one another!

All our collective hearts went out to Jordan Spieth on Sunday afternoon as he imploded and lost the 2016 Masters Championship.  But he is not alone.  Almost every great has experienced the feeling of a Major Championship slipping slowly through their fingers. Some of the greatest names in professional golf like Greg Norman, Arnold Palmer, Sam Snead, Ben Hogan have succumbed.  Jordan is not the first, and he certainly won’t be the last!  It just reminds us that these great players are human and get nervous just like the rest of us!  Thanks so much to of Golf Digest for this comprehensive and interesting list!

1939 U.S. Open

Chin Up Jordan - All the greats have lost in dramatic fashion!

Snead in defeat!

The only blemish on Sam Snead’s career is never winning the U.S. Open. In 1939, he had arguably his best chance to do it, needing a par 5 on the 72nd hole at Philadelphia C.C. to win. Snead, though, mistakenly thought he needed a birdie, played the hole aggressively and made a triple-bogey 8 to finish in fifth, with Byron Nelson winning.

1955 U.S. Open

Chin Up Jordan - All the greats have lost in dramatic fashion!

Hogan & Fleck 1955 US Open.

1966 U.S. Open

Chin Up Jordan - All the greats have lost in dramatic fashion!

 
 
Thanks for reading – Chin Up Jordan – All the greats have lost in dramatic fashion!

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Should we give the USGA a break on Chambers Bay?

Should we give the USGA a break on Chambers Bay?

Should we give the USGA a break on Chambers Bay?

Golf Chats is a website to encourage discussions on various subjects relating to the game of golf. I am Mel Sole, Director of Instruction of the Mel Sole Golf School and SAPGA Master Professional.  I invite you to enter into a discussion on this or any article on the golfchats.com website.  The input is for the entire subscriber base to learn something new each time!  Please post your comments below.  Keep it clean and tasteful.  We are here to learn from one another!

The USGA has taken criticism from every angle.  

Golf Pros, Press, General Public, and bloggers and posters like myself.  But when you look at the USGA’s intent, they were only doing what they thought was right.  And how many times in our lives have we thought we were doing something with honorable intentions, only to have it blow up in our face?  Here is a great story from Michael Fitzpatrick of bleacherreport.com, who is on the USGA side.  Maybe!

Should we give the USGA a break on Chambers Bay?

Chambers Bay certainly turned out to be a spectacularly beautiful location!

The USGA has long been the target of fierce criticism within the world of golf.

It has been accused of being too conservative and not progressing with technology and a changing culture.

It has been accused of being too rigid in its devotion to what many view as antiquated rules of the game.

The USGA has often attempted to roll back golfing technology that makes it easier for amateur players (who make up 99 percent of the golfing public in America) to enjoy the game, such as new golf ball technology and anchored putters. This has put the organization at odds with the PGA of America more than a few times over the past several decades.

In essence, the USGA is viewed by many as an organization that has been set in its outdated ways for far too long.

While there is certainly some credence to this unflattering public image the USGA has obtained, the organization has attempted to alter its behaviors in recent years. Yet these attempts have more often than not yielded even further criticism from players, fans and the media.

For example, the USGA had long been criticized for creating U.S. Open courses that were difficult to the point of being almost unfair.

Pundits claim was that it was over the top to have rough so thick that players were in effect receiving a penalty of at least one stroke for missing a fairway by just a few inches.

So, in 2006, the USGA tried introducing  graduated rough at Winged Foot.  At which time the organization promptly had the acusation of going soft on the best players in the world at an event that is meant to be the toughest test in all of golf.

In recent years the USGA has also tried to stray from its cookie-cutter U.S. Open course selection process (very long, traditional, northern golf courses).

The USGA took the Open back to Merion in 2013, which was a track many believed could never host an Open again due to its inability to stretch the course beyond 7,000 yards.

Should we give the USGA a break on Chambers Bay?

Merion with their familiar Basket instead of a flag was a stern test despite its length!

The USGA then took the 2014 Open back to Pinehurst, which had no rough at all and had been pursuing a center-row irrigation system to preserve water and operating costs.

Merion was widely regarded as a success in 2013, as was Pinehurst in 2014.

The USGA once again tried to push the envelope by selecting Chambers Bay for the 2015 U.S. Open.

Not a lot of water is needed to sustain Chambers Bay.

The greens are comprise of the exact same type of grass used throughout the rest of the course (fescue).

No expensive man-made water hazards were included in the construction process.

The bunkering consists of a mixture of sand and the natural soil, which is why you may have seen players removing stones from bunkers without being penalized last week.

Chambers Bay was chosen as much to showcase a working example of a sustainable, affordable golf course built on top of what was essentially wasteland.  And it was chosen to challenge the best players in the world.

While Merion and Pinehurst were huge successes, Chambers Bay was clearly a poor decision by the USGA.

The main criteria through which to measure a good golf course vs. a bad course is quite simple—a good course rewards good shots and penalizes bad ones.

Unfortunately the exact opposite occurred last week at Chambers Bay.

To see the rest of Michael Fitzpatrick’s report, go here.

Read more Golf news on BleacherReport.com

via 2015 US Open: Let’s Give the USGA a Break on Chambers Bay

Source: Michael Fitzpatrick   bleacherreport.com

Pictures: Christina  Keith Allison

Thanks for reading – Should we give the USGA a break on Chambers Bay? 

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Governor Scott Walker supports the golf industry in Wisconsin.

Governor Scott Walker supports the golf industry in Wisconsin.

Governor Scott Walker supports the golf industry in Wisconsin.

Golf Chats is a website to encourage discussions on various subjects relating to the game of golf. I am Mel Sole, Director of Instruction of the Mel Sole Golf School and SAPGA Master Professional.  I invite you to enter into a discussion on this or any article on the golfchats.com website.  The input is for the entire subscriber base to learn something new each time!  Please post your comments below.  Keep it clean and tasteful.  We are here to learn from one another!

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker supported the golf industry in WI and reported on its many benefits at a media event this week.

Governor Scott Walker supports the golf industry in Wisconsin.

Governor Scott Walker is a golfer and a supporter of the US Open coming to WI!

The 2017 U.S. Open will be played at Erin Hills, a public course, in Erin, WI. Walker said, “…. Golf puts 38,000 people to work in this state and has a $2.4 billion economic impact.”

Walker also indicated that the U.S. Open in 2017 would generate over $140 million.

This man is a breath of fresh air, which “gets it,” that golf is not a frivolous pastime to be frowned upon by some businesses and some politicians. Golf has always provided huge employment opportunities and huge financial help for communities and charities.

See the story here by John Strege for Golf Digest.

The U.S. Open is to head to another public course, Erin Hills in Erin, Wis., in 2017, and at a media event there to start the publicity machine on Wednesday.  Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker stopped by and spoke about the economic benefit of golf to the state.

“The reason I’m here is not because I’m a golfer, although I admire people who are good at it,” Walker said. “The reason I’m here is for the green on the greens. [Golf] puts 38,000 people to work in this state and has a $2.4 billion economic impact. If it has an impact on the state’s economy, I’m all for it.”

To read the rest of this story by John Strege, check it out here.

Source: John Strege   Golf Digest

Pictures: Gateway Technical College   DonkeyHotey

Thanks for reading – Governor Scott Walker supports the golf industry in Wisconsin.

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Are Pro Golfers paid enough - Not if you compare other sports!

Are Pro Golfers paid enough – Not if you compare other sports!

Are Pro Golfers paid enough – Not if you compare other sports!

Golf Chats is a website to encourage discussions on various subjects relating to the game of golf. I am Mel Sole, Director of Instruction of the Mel Sole Golf School and SAPGA Master Professional.  I invite you to enter into a discussion on this or any article on the golfchats.com website.  The input is for the entire subscriber base to learn something new each time!  Please post your comments below.  Keep it clean and tasteful.  We are here to learn from one another!

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We all tend to think that professional athletes from any sport, make tons of money, and they do.  

But how does golf stack up against the other sports?  If we look at the tennis players, it’s not even close.  Professional golfers are underpaid in comparison to a lot of other sports.  Do you think that Pro Golfers need to be paid more?  Read what Golf Week and Alex Miceli  think about this!

Two-time major champion Jordan Spieth clutches the U.S. Open trophy.

Two-time major champion Jordan Spieth clutches the U.S. Open trophy. ( USGA )

In earning $1.8 million for winning the recent U.S. Open, Jordan Spieth pocketed 12 1/2 times what Jack Nicklaus won on his biggest payday as a player. Of course, more than inflation has been at work in boosting golf purses since the Golden Bear won $144,000 on that momentous 1986 spring day at Augusta National.

Television has enriched PGA Tour purses and, by extension, a new generation of golfers.

In Nicklaus’ day, a $1.8 million purse was big news. Today, a champion takes home that much from a purse of $10 million at events such as the Masters, Players, U.S. Open, and PGA.

Big money, for sure, but is it equitable with other sports’ payouts?

In tennis, the 2015 French Open offered a total prize fund for men and women of more than $30 million. By comparison, the sum of the men’s and women’s U.S. Open golf purses will be $14 million.

The male and female tennis winners at Wimbledon this year will pocket more than $3 million. At tennis’ U.S. Open, the winners will receive even bigger slices from the richest of the sport’s four Grand Slam events, with a purse expected to top $40 million.

Comparing golf to tennis seems fair. The competitors in both sports are independent contractors, pay their own way and get paid depending on how well they perform. However, comparing golf purses with the money in the four major team sports – football, basketball, baseball and hockey – can get off kilter.

The NBA recently signed a new TV deal for $24 billion that will go into effect in 2016.

Under the NBA’s collective-bargaining agreement, the players will receive roughly 50 percent of all income. The team salary cap will jump from $66 million to potentially $90 million in the first year and eventually to $100 million.

In August 2013, the USGA signed a new TV contract with Fox that by all reports more than doubled the previous deal with NBC and averages about $100 million a year for golf’s governing body in the U.S., its territories and Mexico. With a few back-of-the-envelope calculations, it’s easy to conclude that Spieth and the other U.S. Open competitors were severely underpaid. That’s right: underpaid.

Consider this assumption, which one source familiar with tournament operations affirmed as reasonable: ticket sales, hospitality, merchandise sales and sponsorship deals generate enough money to conduct the U.S. Open. That would leave the pile of TV money untouched.

Cutting the $100 million in half for the USGA to continue to operate and then splitting the remaining $50 million between the association and the Open competitors would leave $25 million for the purse, from which the winner would receive about $4.5 million.

Of course, that breakdown comes after including only the domestic TV rights to the Open.

The international rights are not even a factor in the equation.

The world’s top golfers generally are accepting of the the purses, which have grown exponentially since Tiger Woods’ rise in the late 1990s: from $70.7 million in 1996 to $314 million this year. 

To read the rest of  Alex Miceli’s story, go here.

Source:  Alex Miceli   Golf Week

Pictures: Golf Week   USGA    www.SeniorLiving.Org

Thanks for reading – Are Pro Golfers paid enough – Not if you compare other sports!

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A Fans experience outside the ropes at the US Open.

A Fans experience outside the ropes at the US Open.

Golf Chats is a website to encourage discussions on various subjects relating to the game of golf. I am Mel Sole, Director of Instruction of the Mel Sole Golf School and SAPGA Master Professional.  I invite you to enter into a discussion on this or any article on the golfchats.com website.  The input is for the entire subscriber base to learn something new each time!  Please post your comments below.  Keep it clean and tasteful.  We are here to learn from one another!

The golf and the greens have been covered extensively at the US Open at Chambers Bay.  

However, this is an interesting perspective from Elisa Gaudet.  As a golf fan, her US Open experience was a lot better than the golf professionals playing the course.  She had no complaints whatsoever! So there were some positives about this much-maligned venue.  Well done, Elisa!

A Fans experience outside the ropes at the US Open.

Being outside the ropes during the U.S. Open at Chambers Bay in Washington State is definitely not a bad thing.

While this course has some of the most stunning views of any course in the country, walking hole by hole can be challenging. As Phil Mickelson notes, “Golf fans are some of the most dedicated fans. Most other sports fans buy a ticket, sit in a seat and see all the action. Golf fans buy a ticket and then they have to walk the course and only see a fraction of the action.

” While this is a challenging walk the views and elevation changes are very rewarding. With that said, there are plenty of activities outside the ropes to make this major event even more memorable. The U.S. Open’s Spectator Square is set up with numerous big screens televising coverage of the tournament and sponsor pavilions that enable the fans to engage in various aspects of the game.

If you are looking for a better view of the action, Phil Mickelson Sr. found a solution. 

Perhaps Phil Mickelson junior’s awareness of the fans’ experience is heightened by the unintentionally manner in which his father came into the periscope business.  Philip Mickelson Sr. explains, “In 1996 Phil started to have a pretty big crowd following him, so my wife bought me a periscope for Christmas. The next thing I know all of my friends were using mine and passing it around to see a lie or how far a player was from the ball. I decided to buy 12 for my friends and give them for Christmas presents. After speaking with the owner in 1997, I ended up buying the company.” 

Mickelson Sr. went on to upgrade the original periscope, used to see over crowds and give viewers a better view of tournament play, and a few years later he created a version that had zoom capabilities. It allows a person to see 22.5 inches higher and 5 times the distance.  Without any endorsement from Phil junior the Sportscope has done very well, selling out three times at the 2008 US Open, and again at the Ryder Cup. It is an officially licensed PGA TOUR product and is also used for hunting, law enforcement, military, concerts and parades.

Mickelson Sr., now almost 80 years old, plans to retire soon from the periscope business.

The onetime Navy fighter pilot turned commercial airlines pilot is happy he was able to give golf fans a way to have a better experience.

A Fans experience outside the ropes at the US Open.

Periscopes developed by Phil Mickelson Sr, are a hot item at Tour events!

If a taste of Washington State is what you desire, the Washington State Wine Commission has created an exceptional wine experience showcasing the best of Washington wines in the Rainier Village hospitality tent lining the 18th fairway. Chris Stone, VP of marketing and communications for the wine commission explains, “We wanted to showcase the diverse selection of wines that represent the region and diversity of varietals and price point.” Many of their guests are wine industry professionals including sommelier’s and wine buyers.

A Fans experience outside the ropes at the US Open.

With over 800 wineries in the state of Washington, choosing which ones would be represented was no easy task. 

An outside five person panel was put together to review the over 420 wines submitted. Ultimately, 140 were chosen and 20 wines are on display per day during the event. Most notable is the fact that Chateau Ste. Michelle, Washington State’s oldest winery, is the largest single producer of Riesling in the world. In addition to their 49 plus wines, they currently have a new collaboration, Tenant, a Rhone style blend made up of 40% Grenache, 35% Shyah and 25% Mourvedre. It is the love child of Chateau Ste. Michelle and the Rhone’s Michel Gassie… and it is delicious.

A Fans experience outside the ropes at the US Open.

Prominent NFL Quarterbacks Dan Marino and Drew Bledsoe’s wines were one sale at the US Open.

While many golf professionals have ventured into the wine industry, most notably Ernie Els, Greg Norman, Luke Donald and Annika Sorenstam, to name a few, some NFL players have also found a passion in winemaking. Two vineyards in the Washington area have strong ties to football and more specifically quarterbacks.

To read the rest of this fascinating article on a golfer’s experience outside the US Open ropes, check it out here.

Source: Elisa Gaudet

Pictures: Paul Takahashi    Elisa Gaudet   Dov Harrington

Thanks for reading – A Fans experience outside the ropes at the US Open.

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Biggest Hero at US Open Golf Championship is Jason Day!

Biggest Hero at US Open Golf Championship is Jason Day!

Biggest Hero at US Open Golf Championship is Jason Day!

Golf Chats is a website to encourage discussions on various subjects relating to the game of golf. I am Mel Sole, Director of Instruction of the Mel Sole Golf School and SAPGA Master Professional.  I invite you to enter into a discussion on this or any article on the golfchats.com website.  The input is for the entire subscriber base to learn something new each time!  Please post your comments below.  Keep it clean and tasteful.  We are here to learn from one another!

The 2015 U.S. Open at Chambers Bay goes into the history books with a huge amount of drama attached to it.

One of the biggest controversies was the USGA’s choice of a golf course that players said was “stupid” – they said the holes were changed during the tournament resulting in confusion, and the greens were “broccoli.” Even the venerable Gary Player weighed in to say, “it’s one of the worst golf courses I’ve seen in my 63 years as a Pro.” Ouch!

All of us were thrilled with the hot action at the end between Dustin Johnson and the final champion, Jordan Spieth. Spieth is the new face of golf on tour, along with Rory McIlroy and a few others. Spieth now holds the Masters and U.S. Open trophies for 2015 and is admired for his skills, plus his demeanor. He is a true Champion and a gentleman.

But my biggest applause goes to Jason Day, who fought this very tough battle without all of his weapons.

Day suffers from vertigo, which causes one to become dizzy, nauseous, and shaky. Imagine trying to golf even the easiest course in the world while experiencing those symptoms.

Biggest Hero at US Open Golf Championship is Jason Day!

Jason & Ellie Day during the PGA TOUR Wives Golf Classic April 19, 2011, Hilton Head, SC

Now try to play the Chambers Bay course with its incredible length and huge elevations that players must constantly hike up and down. Even healthy players like Tiger Woods struggled to keep their footing and slipped in the deep grass on hillsides.

At the end of Day’s second round on Friday, he collapsed suddenly, and his head bounced once on the ground as he passed out. Jason recovered and finished the round with a bogey but was visibly shaken. On day 3, he returned to play amid great fan support and shared the lead at one point. On the final day, one could see that Day was physically zapped. He couldn’t gather the energy needed to compete at his best and shot 74, finishing at even-par for the tournament.

Someone said that Jason Day has the heart of a lion, and I agree. He put me in mind of the great Ken Venturi, who collapsed from dehydration and heat exhaustion in 1964 but went on to win the U.S. Open dramatically.

Cheers to these warriors!

Source: Mel Sole

Pictures: Keith Allison

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10 Ways FOX could have improved it’s first US Open coverage!

10 Ways FOX could have improved it’s first US Open coverage!

Golf Chats is a website to encourage discussions on various subjects relating to the game of golf. I am Mel Sole, Director of Instruction of the Mel Sole Golf School and SAPGA Master Professional.  I invite you to enter into a discussion on this or any article on the golfchats.com website.  The input is for the entire subscriber base to learn something new each time!  Please post your comments below.  Keep it clean and tasteful.  We are here to learn from one another!

In my opinion, the inaugural coverage of the 115th US Open Championship by FOX Sports was OK.  

US TV coverage can learn a lot from the European Tour.  Less screen time for the announcers and more coverage of the golf.  The Europeans have this down to a fine art.

As John Strege points out while writing for Golf Digest’s The Loop, some broadcasters like Brad Faxon, Julie Inkster, and Holly Sonders was underutilized while too much homage to the USGA was poured out in buckets by Greg Norman. It got a bit much towards the end.

And finally, in my opinion, the word “fescue” was said about a hundred thousand times!  What happened to “He hit it in the rough”?  Why did it always have to be “He hit it in the fescue”? I hope future broadcasts of this championship can learn from their glaring mistakes!

How did Fox Sports do with its initial foray into U.S. Open broadcasting? Let’s start with the premise that it’s a thankless job. If social media were the sole arbiter of what constitutes quality sports broadcasting, well, then no one does it well, whatever the sport, whoever the anchors and analysts.

10 Ways FOX could have improved it's first US Open coverage!

FOX Sports Joe Buck was the lone professional in the booth!

Fox did fine. Not great, but OK for a first effort, and nothing that would cause heads to explode. Or longing for ESPN and Berman.

So, with that said, here is my two cents (which at that price is probably too much) on 10 things Fox could do to improve:

1. Holly Sonders was not put to use in her strengths and instead was in the wrong role as interviewer.

Not a strength. She’d have been better in the role of moderator, as she did for Golf Channel, which leads us to…

2. Curt Menefee, an otherwise outstanding broadcaster and host of Fox NFL Sunday.

But his limited knowledge of golf became apparent early in the week. Sonders would have been a better fit.

3. Less USGA worship. It’s not going to happen, of course, because the USGA is Fox’s “partner,” as they like to say.

To its credit, though, Fox did not shy from reporting on course criticisms, which by extension were USGA criticisms.

4. What to do about Greg Norman? He’s an identifiable brand in the lead analyst’s chair, and that’s fine.

But he tended not to lead the analysis, but to follow points made by other commentators. Maybe less Norman and more Brad Faxon?

5. Less talking, period.

 Cutting to the set for roundtable discussions was overdone, too. Show the golf.

To see the other 5 ways Fox Sports could have improved its US Open coverage, check it out here.

Source: Golf Digest  John Strege

Pictures: Golf Digest

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